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Child Abuse Prevention Month

April 30 marks the last day of Child Abuse Prevention Month, but child abuse doesn’t end at the end of April, and neither can prevention. 

Child abuse is happening all of the time, every month of the year, at all hours of the day. In April alone, an estimated 150 children in the United States will die due to abuse of neglect. In reality that number is likely much greater. Now just image that number every month for a year. Those children and the children who live through abuse every day is why we must continue to work as a community to prevent child abuse beyond the month of April.

Pinwheels for Child Abuse Prevention

Though for Wyoming, it is a little early to plant a garden, the Children’s Advocacy Project uses this month to plant a different type of garden. This garden is made of blue pinwheels to help bring awareness to Child Abuse Prevention Month. The month of April is nationally designated to acknowledge the importance of communities working together to prevent child abuse and neglect.

By its very nature, the pinwheel connotes whimsy and childlike notions. The pinwheel is meant to represent healthy, happy childhoods and is the official symbol of child abuse prevention.

Child Abuse Prevention Month

April is Child Abuse Prevention Month, a time to recognize the role each of us play in helping children to have happy and safe childhoods.

Last year an estimated 678,000 children were found to be victims of child abuse or neglect nationwide. Child abuse and neglect happens across every socioeconomic level. Child abuse can happen anywhere, to any child regardless of race, culture, or education level. The overall wellbeing of our community is contingent on everyone in our community doing well, but child abuse is happening in our community, to our children.

Madison

Madison never thought she would look forward to her future. She saw no reason to create goals or have dreams. She knew that, like her mother before her, she would probably get pregnant, drop out of high school, work a low-paying job and that would be her life.

Madison’s story started off not that different from most of the children we serve at The Children’s Advocacy Project.